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Recurrent aphthous stomatitis major

Aphthous stomatitis is a painful and often recurrent inflammatory process of the oral mucosa that can appear secondary to various well-defined disease processes. Idiopathic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is referred to as recurrent aphthous stomatitis Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common chronic disease of the oral cavity, affecting 5-25% of the population. The underlying etiology remains unclear, and no curative treatment is available

A case of major Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS) in an 11-year-old girl is described to illustrate a disease which is relatively rare in children. The patient manifested classic signs of major RAS: painful ulcers, 5-10 millimeters in diameter, present on the lower lip, on the free and attached gi Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common condition in which round or ovoid painful ulcers recur on the oral mucosa Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: Diagnosis and Management in Primary Care. Abstract. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (canker sores) is a very common oral condition that remains incompletely understood. Presentation has been well-classified into minor, major or herpetiform subcategories based on clinical features, but exact etiology is unknown 1). The working diagnosis for this case was major recurrent aphthous stomatitis with a differential diagnosis of Behcet Syndrome. Patient signed an informed consent and agreed to get treatment from our dental hospital. Symptomatic therapy consisted of mouthwash with chlorine dioxide was done. Patient was referred for blood tests

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis consists of round or oval shaped ulcers with an area of surrounding redness. The base of an ulcer is typically grey/yellow in colour. Size varies according to the type of ulcer and this may range from a few millimetres in diameter to greater than one centimetre. What are the symptoms of recurrent aphthous stomatitis INTRODUCTION. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), also known as canker sores, is a common disease of the oral and, occasionally, genital mucosa characterized by the repeated development of one to many discrete, painful ulcers that usually heal within 7 to 14 days [].The lesions are typically 3 to 5 mm, round to oval ulcers with a peripheral rim of erythema and a yellowish adherent exudate. Sometimes patients are unlucky enough that they have major aphthous stomatitis. This can look really scary. It is very painful, and the lesions will resolve within a couple weeks. Patients may or may not have a couple episodes of major aphthous stomatitis a year

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS; Recurrent Aphthous Ulcers; Canker Sores) adalah salah satu penyakit pada rongga mulut yang paling sering terjadi, dan termasuk dalam kelompok penyakit inflamasi kronis pada mukosa mulut. RAS ini dapat muncul pada semua usia, tetapi paling sering dijumpai pada kelompok usia 20-30 tahun Sutton disease II is characterized by the recurring eruption of painful inflamed ulcers in the mouth (stomatitis). There may be multiple ulcers of varying sizes. These ulcers in the mouth are commonly called canker sores. Sutton disease II is also known as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The exact cause of this disease is not fully understood.

Aphthous stomatitis or recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAU) tend to occur singly on the nonkeratinized oral mucosa. They are circular lesions with an erythematous border surrounding necrotic epithelial cells that are self-limiting and heal in 10 to 14 days. 53 Pain associated with aphthous ulcers is dependent on the size, location, and depth of the. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases characterized by recurrent and painful ulcerations on the movable or nonkeratinized oral mucosae. Clinically, three types of RAS, namely minor, major, and herpetiform types, can be identified. RAS more commonly affects labial mucosa, buccal mucosa, and tongue

Aphthae ( Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis ): Clinical

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis & Oral Herpes Dr. Ross Kerr Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology, Radiology & Medicine New York University College of Dentistry Diplomate, American Board of Oral Medicine 212-998-9885 ark3@nyu.ed It is termed major aphthous ulceration (MaAU) or major recurrent aphthous stomatitis (MaRAS). Major aphthous ulcers (major aphthae) are similar to minor aphthous ulcers, but are more than 10 mm in diameter and the ulceration is deeper. Because the lesions are larger, healing takes longer (about twenty to thirty days), and may leave scars Among the oral ulcers, Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common form of ulceration.It is a disease characterized by episodic appearance of oral ulcers in which etiology and pathophysiology remains unclear. The word aphthous was originated with Hippocrates in 460-370BC in reference to disorders of mouth (Terri.S.I. et al. 2002) Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS) is a disorder characterized by recurring ulcers in the oral mucosa in patients with no other signs of disease. This condition is also called as Sutton's disease, especially in the case of major, multiple or recurring ulcers

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Revie

Recurrent mouth ulcers are not thought to be infectious. Is recurrent aphthous stomatitis hereditary? Nearly half the people who suffer from mouth ulcers have a close relative with the same problem. What does recurrent aphthous stomatitis look like? RAS consists of round or oval shaped ulcers with an area of surrounding redness Treatment of Aphthous Ulcers: There is no medical treatment for aphthous ulcers. Main concern for the Treatment is to decrease the discomfort of the patient and to promote the healing of Ulcers on their own. Most recurrent minor aphthous ulcers heal within 1-2 weeks without any treatment and Major Aphthous Ulcers heal within 6 weeks What is recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS)? RAS consists of recurrent bouts of one or more painful, rounded or ovoid ulcers. Most aphthous ulcers last for 10-14 days. It is a common mouth condition affecting up to 20% of the population at any given time. The severity and frequency of RAS tends to decrease with age

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis Shah K, Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2016;117 (4):341-343 •Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common inflammatory and ulcerative condition of the oral cavity. •The term aphthous is derived from a Greek word aphtha, which means ulceration Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa. It is characterized by painful mouth ulcers that cannot be explained by an underlying disease. Recurrent oral mucosal ulcers require a proper differential diagnosis to rule out other possible causes before recurrent aphthous stomatitis is diagnosed The 3 main clinical types of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) are as follows: Minor aphthous ulcers (MiAUs, 80% of all RAS) Major aphthous ulcers (MjAUs) Herpetiform ulcers. However, any. Major Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis Major RAS is occasionally referred to as Sutton's disease or periadenitis mucosa necrotica recurrens and is less common (approximately 10% to 15% of all RAS) yet more severe than minor RAS

Use of hyaluronic acid-based products has become a valuable alternative to drug-based approaches in the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). The presented study aimed to investigate the effect of a barrier forming hyaluronic acid containing mouth wash or a topical gel formulation on the healing of RAS and patient's quality of life While the occasional canker sore is one thing, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) can be even more bothersome. RAS is the term used when canker sores keep coming back. Merck Manuals estimates that 20 to 30 percent of adults have recurring canker sores, and the condition is even more common in children Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), also known as canker sores, is an oral ulcerative condition. Although a variety of host and environmental factors have been implicated, including trauma, nutritional deficiencies, and autoimmunity, the precise etiology remains unknown

Treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis

The 3 main clinical types of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) are as follows: Minor aphthous ulcers (MiAUs, 80% of all RAS) Major aphthous ulcers (MjAUs) Herpetiform ulcers. However, any significance of these distinctions is unclear (ie, they could just be 3 distinct disorders) CONCLUSION Recurrent aphthous ulcers, or canker sores, are the most common recurrent oral ulcers. There are three subtypes: minor, major, and herpetiform. They appear as a yellowish white round to oval ulcer with an erythematous halo. The etiology of aphthous stomatitis is unknown Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), or what is commonly referred to as canker sores, is a form of benign or major if they are greater ½ inch, take longer than 2 weeks to heal and leave scars. Some patients may have multiple recurrent crops of small Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common acute oral ulcerative condition in North America. RAS is divided into a mild, common form, simple aphthosis, and a severe, less common form, complex aphthosis. Aphthosis is a reactive condition. The lesions of RAS can represent the mucosal manifestation of a variety of conditions. These include conditions with oral and genital aphthae such.

Chapter 41

Major recurrent aphthous stomatitis in an 11-year-old girl

recurrent attacks of minor; major or herpetiform aphthae with distinct ulcer-free periods Complex aphpthous diagnosis almost constant presence of >3 oral apthahae or recurrent oral and genital aphthae and exclusion of complex aphthosi Most recurrent minor aphthous ulcers heal within 1-2 weeks without scarring without any treatment. Minor aphthous ulcers commonly recur intermittently. Recurrent aphthous ulcers are mostly a minor nuisance, but they are associated with significant health problems in some people. Major aphthous ulcer heals with scarring Recurrent oral aphthae. K12.0 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. The 2021 edition of ICD-10-CM K12.0 became effective on October 1, 2020. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of K12.0 - other international versions of ICD-10 K12.0 may differ

Discovering Aphthous Stomatitis

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis - Dental Disorders - Merck

of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, so therapy can attempt only to suppress symptoms. A R TIC L E 4 Background.Recurrent aphthous stom-atitis, or RAS, is a common oral disorder of uncertain etiopathogenesis for which symptomatic therapy only is available. This article reviews the current data on the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of. Aphthous stomatitis, also known as recurrent aphthous ulcers or canker sores, is among the most common oral mucosal lesion physicians and dentists observe. Aphthous stomatitis is a disorder of unknown etiology that may cause significant morbidity. One or several discrete, shallow, painful ulcers are visible on the unattached oral mucous membranes

Background: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a major oral health problem, where its etiopathogenesis is not well understood. Accordingly, its therapy whether topical or systemic can induce clearance, but the relapse rate is high. Objective: To use 100% topical pumpkin seed oil in RAS as it has many actions as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a condition characterized by painful ulcers of variable size and duration that typically affect non-keratinized oral mucosa. They are classified clinically into minor, major and herpetiformis. Ulcers may result in impairment of speech, oral hygiene and feeding, leading to nutritional deficit and poor quality of.

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: Diagnosis and Management in

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. R ecurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common disorder affecting 5% to 66% of examined adult patient groups. There may be a female predominance in some adult and child patient groups. Epidemologic study on recurrent aphthous stomatitis in a Thai dental patient population Major recurrent aphthous immuno-suppression caused by medical stomatitis lesions are large (greater than 5 mm), treatments, systemic diseases or both, the can last for 6 weeks or longer, and frequently scar Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a chronic, painful ulcerative disease of the oral mucosa that may be resistant to treatment. Its clinical heterogeneity has complicated classification of the. DISTRIBUTION OF TYPES OF RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS [RAS] BY RACE AND SEX TYPES OF MALAYS CmNESE INDIANS RECURRENT TOTAL PERCENTAGE APHTHOUS ULCERS M F M F M F 1. Minor 16 19 17 14 13 14 93 62.8 Aphthous Ulcer 2. Major 11 10 9 5 7 1 43 . 29.1 Aphthous Ulcer 3. Herpetiform 1 4 1-1 1 8 5.4 Ulcers 4. Behcet's-1 1 2-4 2.7 Syndrome TOTAL 28 34 27. An exploration of point, annual, and lifetime prevalence in characterizing recurrent aphthous stomatitis in USA children and youths. J Oral Pathol Med . 2004 Oct. 33 (9):558-66. [Medline]

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis; canker sore; multi-vitamin; vitamin Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), also known as canker sores, is a common disease, affecting an estimated 2.5 billion people worldwide.1 Clinically, this disease manifests as recurrent, painful oral ulcerations. Three clinical types have been described: minor, major The correct diagnosis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS, sometimes also referred to as recurrent oral ul-ceration or canker sores) is central to oral medicine. There are over 40 types of mouth ulcers, many related to systemic diseases, but RAS is characterised by oral ulcers, occurring singly or in crops that usually last fo Aphthous stomatitis, or recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAUs) or canker sores, are among the most common oral mucosal lesions physicians and dentists observe. Recurrent aphthous ulcer is a disorder of unknown etiology that can cause clinically significant morbidity

Management of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis Major in a

  1. or aphthae (MiRAS), 20 to major aphthae (MaRAS), and 7 to herpes-like ulcerations (HU). MiRAS was seen to present the lowest rate of recurrences, as well as the shortest duration and the fewest lesions per episode. In turn, MaRAS presented the longest duration per recurrence.
  2. Recurrent aphthous ulcers are the most prevalent oral mucosal disease, but the subset major aphthous ulcer is a less frequent type. These ulcers are refractory, may persist for several weeks to months, and interfere with the normal state of health. The aetiology is multifactorial and so is the treatment. We present a case of an adolescent male patient reported with multiple oral ulcers
  3. Aphthous stomatitis is commonly defined as recurrent ulcerations of the oral mucosa. The most affected areas of the oral cavity are the labial mucosa, buccal mucosa, and tongue. Unlike for example cold sores, which develop on the outside of the mouth, these ulcerations are non-contagious. This is a critical point to get across to patients, who.

Clinical characteristics and risk factors of major oral ulcers in the mandibular retromolar region in children Association between recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori. the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The major source of vitamin D in humans is endogen-ous synthesis in the skin with the help of sunshine. Sal-mon, mackerel, caviar, and eggs are the other sources of vitamin D [15]. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency at al

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  1. Aphthous stomatitis, also known as recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAU) or canker sores, is a specific type of stomatitis that presents with shallow, painful ulcers that are usually located on the lips, cheeks, gums, or roof or floor of the mouth.These ulcers can range from pinpoint size to up to 1 in (2.5 cm) or more in diameter
  2. Fig 3 .3Recurrent aphthous stomatitis, major aphthous ulcer. One large aphthous ulcer is present on the right labial mucosa. A scar from a previous major aphthous ulcer is present on the left labial mucosa. Major aphthous ulcers often heal with scarring because of the size and depth of the ulcer
  3. Start studying Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools
  4. For recurrent aphthous stomatitis or recalcitrant aphthous stomatitis from underlying disease, first-line treatment consists of topical medications with use of systemic medications as necessary. Herein, the authors discuss the differential diagnosis and treatment ladder of aphthous stomatitis as described in the literature
  5. or, major and herpetiform major aphthous ulceration. Minor aphthous ulceration is the most common type, presenting with 1-6 small (2-4mm diameter), round/oval ulcers with a yellow-grey color and an erythematous (red) halo
  6. or aphthous ulcers, but are more than 10 mm in diameter and the ulceration is deeper
  7. A: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the name given to the condition of experiencing frequent bouts of aphthous mouth ulcers (aphthae). Although a single bout of aphthous stomatitis is possible, recurrent episodes are the norm. Episodes of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) typically occur at intervals of between a few months to a few.

Aphthous Stomatitis: Treatment, Diagnosis, and Clinical

  1. osis, diabetes mellitus, diseases of the cardiovascular, nervous, hematopoietic, and digestive systems, acute infections (for example, measles, scarlet fever, and diphtheria), chronic infections (for example.
  2. DOI: 10.4103/ijofb.ijofb_14_17 Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is commonly known as mouth ulcer. RAS is a very common disease of the mouth. Hence, it is important for dental clinicians to know about the clinical features, causes, diagnostic techniques, and the treatment and management of RAS
  3. Major recurrent aphthous stomatitis. This type is characterized by large ulcers that last from two to six weeks. They can appear anywhere in the mouth, including the gums, the roof of the mouth.
  4. or); Bednar's aphthae; Periadenitis mucosa necrotica recurrens; Recurrent aphthous ulcer; Stomatitis.
Recurrent aphthous stomatitisRecurrent Aphthous Stomatitis | Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas

Sutton Disease II - NORD (National Organization for Rare

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is an ulcerative disease of the oral cavity and can occur in isolation or as a manifestation of many systemic diseases. It is a quite common entity and may hence often be overlooked as an isolated lesion. Gilbert's syndrome is a genetic disorder where a deficiency of an enzyme associated with the conjugation of bilirubin results in unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia The term major aphthous stomatitis has been used and is defined as ulcers greater than 1 cm that are present for more than two weeks and often heal with scarring. Recurrent aphthous ulcer usually begins as a round yellowish elevated spot surrounded by a red halo It is termed major aphthous ulceration (MaAU) or major recurrent aphthous stomatitis (MaRAS). [en.wikipedia.org] The prevalence was related to the place of living, income, and college, but not to gender, marital status, medical history, smoking, or aphthous stomatitis Synonyms for major aphthous stomatitis in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for major aphthous stomatitis. 4 words related to stomatitis: inflammation, redness, rubor, vesicular stomatitis. What are synonyms for major aphthous stomatitis

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common condition in which round or ovoid painful ulcers recur on the oral mucosa. Etiology is unclear. Diagnosis is clinical. Treatment is symptomatic and usually includes topical corticosteroids. (See also Stomatitis and Evaluation of the Dental Patient . Jusri and Nurdiana: Treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis major 111 On second visit (two days later), the patient came for the first control. According to anamnesis it was known the pain has decreased. The result from cytology examination showed eosinofilic amorphous material, squamous cells spread, and cells with round nucleus degeneration Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS)—otherwise known as canker sores, aphthous stomatitis, recurring oral aphthae, and recurrent aphthous ulceration—is a common cause of benign and noncontagious mouth ulcers, affecting about 20% of the general population.It is characterized by the appearance of an erythematous macule that develops into a painful, rounded or oval, ulcer covered with a yellow.

Aphthous Stomatitis - an overview ScienceDirect Topic

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (canker sores) is a very common oral condition that remains incompletely understood. Presentation has been well-classified into minor, major or herpetiform subcategories based on clinical features, but exact etiology is unknown. Because etiology is unclear, treatments are primarily empiric and aimed at symptom reduction rather than prevention or cure Major recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a rare and severe form of RAS. It often produces coalescent ulcers, and tends to involve mucosa overlying minor salivary glands. Approximately 10 to 15 percent of RAS cases are major RAS.19 It usually appears after Figure 2. Major aphthous stomatititis1 Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a disease of the oral mucosa which appears typically as ulcers in the mouth and causes severe pain. Repeated occurrence of ulcers is very debilitating. The prevalence, clinical presentation, etiology and pathogenesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis will be discussed in this review

In patients with constant and aggressive outbreaks (major aphthae), pain is intense and topical treatment is unable to afford symptoms relief. Systemic therapy is indicated in such situations, in the form of corticosteroids (prednisone) or thalidomide, among other drugs. Key words: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis, treatment, clinical management Figure 2 Major aphthous ulcer, active phase (lower lip, HIV positive 44-year-old male). (a) Segmental arteritis deeply located beneath the ulcer. (b) Detail of arteritis, with occlusive thrombosis of the vessel lumen. (c) Recurrent major aphthous ulcer, cicatricial fibrous artery in scar tissue (58-year-old female) Recurrent aphthous stomatitis Recurrent aphthous stomatitis: A case report Dr. Md. Asad Iqubal, Dr. Naushad Anwar, Dr. Mobeen Khan, Dr. Chandra Prakash Gupta, Dr. Hanjala Shafi Rayeen and Dr. Divyanshu Shrivastava Abstract Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) or recurrent aphthous an ulcer (RAU) is a common disorde Clinically, 3 forms of recurrent aphthous ulceration exist: major, minor, and herpetiform. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is distinguished from aphthous-like ulceration by exclusion of underlying systemic conditions (e.g., Behcet syndrome, HIV/AIDS, or cyclic neutropenia). Diagnosis is based on th..

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis - Etiology, serum

In patients with constant and aggressive outbreaks (major aphthae), pain is intense and topical treatment is unable to afford symptoms relief. Systemic therapy is indicated in such situations, in the form of corticosteroids (prednisone) or thalidomide, among other drugs. Key words:Recurrent aphthous stomatitis, treatment, clinical management Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis The overall goal of this article is to provide the reader with information and scientific data on recurrent aphthous stomatitis. On completion of this course, the participant will be able to do the following: 1. List and describe the different types of recurrent aphthous ulcers; 2 Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the presence of ulcerous lesions in the oral mucosa, with well defined clinical characteristics, highly prevalent in the general population and with a favorable prognosis. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis has received different names over time, such as aphtha o Aphthous stomatitis is a common ailment, idiopathic in nature, with recurrent painful aphthous ulcers (commonly termed canker sores) on the non-keratinized oral mucous membranes. This activity reviews the evaluation and treatment of aphthous stomatitis, and the role of interprofessional teams caring for patients afflicted with this condition The term aphthous is derived from the Greek word aphtha which means ulceration. It can affect up to 25% of the general population. The etiology is unclear; however, a variety of conditions may predispose the patient to develop recurrent ulcers, such as folic acid deficiency, neutropenia, iron deficiency anemia, heredity, trauma, emotional stress, hypersensitivity to certain foods.

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a disorder characterized by recurring ulcers in the oral mucosa in patients with no other signs of disease. RAS appears to represent several pathological states with similar clinical manifestations, including immunologic disorders, hematologic deficiencies, and allergic or psychological abnormalities Keywords: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis, Oral microbiota, Pyrosequencing Background Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common oral mucosal disorders affecting at least 10 to 20 % of the general population [1]. RAS is characterized by the recurrent occurrence of well-circumscribed, single o Aphthous stomatitis is a painful and often recurrent inflammatory process of the oral mucosa that can appear secondary to various well-defined disease processes. Idiopathic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is referred to as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcerations is extensive and ranges from. Correspondence The new england journal of medicine n engl j med 381;20 nejm.orgNovember 14, 2019 Apremilast in Treatment-Refractory Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis To the Editor: Recurrent aphthous.

Oral Ulceration | Aetiology, Symptoms, Signs | Geeky MedicsFifteen-minute consultation: a structured approach to the

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral disorder with a prevalence varying between 5% and 66%. RAS appears in three forms; minor, major and herpetiform. The aetiology is unknown.The aim of this study was to evaluate associations between specific anamnestic information and different types of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) Aphthous Stomatitis Incidence. Mouth ulcers of this type are found more in women than men. It is common in babies, toddlers and adults. Around 50% of the global population seems to be affected with this disease. Herpetiform recurrent aphthous ulcer and major recurrent aphthous ulcer are not so common. Almost 80% of the cases reported show. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common oral mucosal disorders. Nevertheless, while the clinical characteristics of RAS are well-defined, the precise etiology and pathogenesis of RAS remain unclear. The present article provides a detailed review of the current knowledge of the etiology, pathogenesis, and managment of RAS Twenty-eight patients clinically had recurrent aphthous stomatitis ofthe minor type, one had major aphthae, and one had herpetiform ulcers.2 Fifteen healthy volunteers without recurrent aphthous stomatitis and matchedfor age and sex served as controls. Thebuccal mucosawasinjured bythree different methods. Firstly Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), also known as canker sores, is the most common disease of the oral mucosa. Unlike caries and periodontal disease, patients with RAS are unable to prevent it. The clinical picture of RAS is characterized by recurrent episodes of solitary or multiple painful ulcerations without association with systemic diseases Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common inflammatory ulcer of the oral cavity. RAS usually presents in childhood or adolescence and can be found in up to 40% of children. Ulcers are categorized as major (>1 cm), minor (<1 cm), or herpetiform. RAS is usually idiopathic but can be associated with Behçet disease (BD), periodic.